Belfast News Letter (Northern Ireland)

 

April 30, 2003, Wednesday

 

HEADLINE: ANNE SOWS SEEDS FOR 9/11 MEMORIAL GARDEN

 

THE Princess Royal yesterday presented the first seeds for a garden of remembrance for the British victims of the September 11 attacks.

 

Princess Anne gave New York parks commissioner Adrian Benepe a collection of seeds taken from royal palaces to ensure that "something from the soil of Britain" is in the Lower Manhattan tribute which is due to be completed in 2004. The garden will commemorate the 67 UK citizens who died in the 2001 attack.

 

"It is difficult to know what memorial is fitting for quite such devastation and loss and shock but this is a very distinctive British contribution," the Princess told dignitaries.

 

"Gardens are about long-term plans and a great deal of love that can be enjoyed at any stage of the day and night."

 

Mr Benepe said the gardens would make New York a greater city and return life to downtown Manhattan.

 

 

 

Birmingham Post

 

April 30, 2003, Wednesday

 

HEADLINE: REMEMBRANCE SEEDS

 

The Princess Royal yesterday presented the first seeds for a garden of remembrance for the British victims of the September 11 attacks. Princess Anne gave New York parks commissioner Adrian Benepe seeds from royal palaces to ensure that 'something from the soil of Britain' is in the Lower Manhattan tribute, which is due to be completed in 2004.

 

The garden will commemorate the 67 UK citizens who died in the attack on the World Trade Centre.

 

 

 

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

April 29, 2003, Tuesday, BC cycle

 

HEADLINE: Princess Anne donates seeds for WTC, Iraq memorial garden

 

A little bit of England will bloom in lower Manhattan in a new garden honoring the British victims of the Sept. 11 World Trade Center attack and British troops who died in the war in Iraq.

 

Princess Anne attended Tuesday's ceremony announcing the British Memorial Garden and donated seeds from a 17th-century royal garden.

 

"This is a very distinctively British contribution," the princess said. "Gardens are about long-term plans and a great deal of care."

 

The garden is scheduled to open next year in historic Hanover Square, near Wall Street.

 

Some of the seeds come from the gardens of the British royal palaces and include marigolds and lupines.

 

A nonprofit trust has been created to raise funds for the $2.5 million project.

 

Princess Anne, the only daughter of Queen Elizabeth II, noted the close working relationship between Wall Street and London.

 

"It came as no surprise, therefore, that the largest number of foreign victims of Sept. 11 were of course British," she said, "and their tragic loss is of course why we are gathered here today."

 

She said that as British and New York officials developed the idea of the garden, they realized that "it could also be a memorial to all British citizens who have given their lives alongside their American colleagues in the cause of freedom, throughout the past century and most recently in Iraq."

 

More than 60 British nationals were killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the trade center. The British government says 32 British soldiers have died in Iraq.

 

On the Net:

 

Memorial garden: http://www.britishmemorialgarden.org

 

 

 

Newsday On-Line

 

Princess Anne donates seeds for WTC, Iraq memorial garden

 

April 29, 2003, 6:55 PM EDT

 

NEW YORK -- A little bit of England will bloom in lower Manhattan in a new garden honoring the British victims of the Sept. 11 World Trade Center attack and British troops who died in the war in Iraq.

 

Princess Anne attended Tuesday's ceremony announcing the British Memorial Garden and donated seeds from a 17th-century royal garden.

 

"This is a very distinctively British contribution," the princess said. "Gardens are about long-term plans and a great deal of care."

 

The garden is scheduled to open next year in historic Hanover Square, near Wall Street.

 

Some of the seeds come from the gardens of the British royal palaces and include marigolds and lupines.

 

A nonprofit trust has been created to raise funds for the $2.5 million project.

 

Princess Anne, the only daughter of Queen Elizabeth II, noted the close working relationship between Wall Street and London.

 

"It came as no surprise, therefore, that the largest number of foreign victims of Sept. 11 were of course British," she said, "and their tragic loss is of course why we are gathered here today."

 

She said that as British and New York officials developed the idea of the garden, they realized that "it could also be a memorial to all British citizens who have given their lives alongside their American colleagues in the cause of freedom, throughout the past century and most recently in Iraq."

 

More than 60 British nationals were killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the trade center. The British government says 32 British soldiers have died in Iraq.